Our Services:

CT (Computed Tomography)

CT sinuses

The paranasal sinus cavities are hollow, air-filled spaces within the bones of the face surrounding the nasal cavity. There are four pairs of sinuses, each connected to the nasal cavity by small openings.

CT scanning is the most reliable imaging technique for determining if the sinuses are obstructed and the best imaging modality for sinusitis.

CT of the sinuses is also used to:

  • evaluate sinuses that are filled with fluid or thickened sinus membranes,
  • detect the presence of inflammatory diseases,
  • Guide procedures such as surgery, biopsy and radiation therapy.
  • provide additional information about tumours of the nasal cavity and sinuses,
  • plan for surgery by defining anatomy.

Metal objects, including earrings & other facial piercings, glasses, dentures, hearing aids and hairpins, may affect the CT images and are removed (if possible) prior to the scan.

For a CT scan of the sinuses, you will be asked to lie flat on your back, with your head in a head rest and chin tilted. It is important that you do not move during the scan.

There is no preparation for the scan. The scan itself should only take a few minutes, but please allow yourself up to half an hour for the appointment.

CT petrous temporal bones (PTB)

The petrous temporal bones contain air-filled cavities located at the sides and base of the skull.

CT scans of this area show detailed images of the bones of the middle ear and can be used to:

  • help diagnose hearing loss,
  • demonstrate a tumour,
  • show evidence of trauma,
  • detect the presence of infections of the ear and mastoids,
  • plan for a mastoidectomy and cochlear implant placement in hearing loss,
  • demonstrate suspected inner ear disease,
  • show disorders of the temporal mandibular joints.

Metal objects, including earrings & other facial piercings, glasses, dentures, hearing aids and hairpins, may affect the CT images and are removed (if possible) prior to the scan.

For a CT scan of the petrous temporal bones, you will be asked to lie flat on your back with your head in a head rest. It is important that you do not move during the scan.

The scan itself should only take a few minutes, but please allow yourself up to half an hour for the appointment.

CT Larynx

The larynx (voice box) is located in the anterior, or front portion, of the neck. It is a part of the respiratory tract, and has several important functions, including producing sound, coughing, and protection of the lower respiratory tract.

CT scanning has become the most commonly used technique for general laryngeal imaging, and is used to investigate:

  • Hoarseness or voice changes,
  • A sore throat that does not go away,
  • Constant coughing,
  • Pain and/or trouble when swallowing,
  • The evaluation of occult fractures and dislocations during laryngeal trauma.

Metal objects, including earrings & other facial piercings, glasses, dentures, hearing aids and hairpins, may affect the CT images and are removed (if possible) prior to the scan.

For a CT scan of the larynx, you will be asked to lie flat on your back, with your head in a head rest. It is important that you do not move during the scan. You will be asked not to swallow during the scan to prevent the images being blurred.

During the scan, CT contrast (x-ray dye) may be required to highlight certain structures on the images. If this is required, you will be asked not to eat or drink anything for four hours before your scan. A small needle (similar to a blood test) is placed in a vein in your arm, and the contrast will be injected during the scan. You may experience a feeling of warmth during the injection or a metallic taste in your mouth. Please note that at this time, contrast studies are performed at our Ascot Hospital location, near the Ellerslie Racecourse.

The scan itself should only take a few minutes, but please allow yourself up to half an hour for the appointment

CT Neck soft tissue with contrast

This is a study of the neck region from the skull base (bottom of the head) to the lung apices (top of the chest). The spine, airway, vessels of the neck, as well as salivary and thyroid glands, are included. The mandible (jaw bone), oral cavity (mouth and tongue), pharynx and larynx (including the vocal cords) are also included.

There are a variety of reasons for this scan including:

  • Parotid or submandibular gland lesion or infection,
  • Head and neck cancers,
  • Neck mass or abscess,
  • Tongue mass or lesion,
  • Foreign body in the neck or upper airway,
  • Tumours or infections involving the vocal cords.

During the scan, CT contrast (x-ray dye) will be used to highlight certain structures on the images and you will be asked not to eat or drink anything for four hours before your scan. A small needle (similar to a blood test) is placed in a vein in your arm, and the contrast will be injected during the scan. You may experience a feeling of warmth during the injection or a metallic taste in your mouth. Please note that at this time, contrast studies are performed at our Ascot Hospital location, near the Ellerslie Racecourse.

Metal objects, including earrings & other facial piercings, glasses, dentures, hearing aids and hairpins, may affect the CT images and are removed (if possible) prior to the scan.

For a CT scan of the soft tissues of the neck, you will be asked to lie flat on your back with your head in a head rest. It is important that you do not move during the scan. You will be asked not to swallow during the scan to prevent the images being blurred.

The scan itself should only take a few minutes, but please allow yourself up to half an hour for the appointment.

CT Chest

A chest CT scan includes images of the lungs, the heart, bones of the thorax and the blood vessels.

These scans are used to:

  • examine abnormalities found on conventional chest x-rays,
  • help diagnose the causes of clinical signs or symptoms of disease of the chest, such as cough, shortness of breath, chest pain, or fever,
  • detect and evaluate the extent of tumors that arise in the chest, or tumors that have spread there from other parts of the body,
  • assess whether tumors are responding to treatment,
  • help plan radiation therapy,
  • evaluate injury to the chest, including the heart, blood vessels, lungs, ribs and spine.

Chest CT can demonstrate various lung disorders, such as:

  • benign and malignant tumors,
  • pneumonia,
  • tuberculosis,
  • bronchiectasis,
  • cystic fibrosis,
  • inflammation or other diseases of the pleura (the covering of the lungs),
  • interstitial and chronic lung disease,
  • congenital abnormalities.

When you arrive for your CT scan, you may be asked to undress from the waist up and wear a gown. Metal objects, including jewellry and piercings, may affect the CT images and should be removed prior to the scan. Women will be asked to remove bras containing metal underwire or clips.

In some CT scans of the chest, contrast (x-ray dye) will be used to make certain structures more visible on the images. If contrast is being used, you will be asked not to eat or drink anything for four hours before your scan. A small needle (similar to a blood test) is placed into a vein in your arm, and the contrast will be injected during the scan. You may experience a feeling of warmth during the injection or a metallic taste in your mouth. Please note that at this time, contrast studies are performed at our Ascot Hospital location, near the Ellerslie Racecourse.

You will be positioned on the CT scanning table, usually lying flat on your back with your arms resting above your head. You will be asked to hold your breath at times during the scan. The scan itself only takes a few minutes, but please allow yourself 30 minutes for the appointment.